Adam Roche | Uxbridge Real Estate, Bellingham Real Estate, Millville Real Estate


If you’re a dog lover, you’re probably going to want to move into a community that caters to your love of animals. As you cruise different communities to find just the right place to live, there are a few things that you should be on the lookout for if you want your pooch to feel at home as well. 


You See A Lot Of Dogs Around


This may seem obvious, but it’s something to be aware of on your home search. If you see a lot of dogs, you know that the people in your neighborhood are supportive of dogs. If there doesn’t seem to be too many four-legged friends running around, then maybe the community won’t be as receptive to your own pet. You would hate to move into a home, only to find out that your neighbors really don’t like dogs. This could be a sign of future problems in the neighborhood.


You See Dogs At The Parks Nearby


If you are riding around a community, exploring, and see plenty of dogs at the park, or even better, a dog park, you’ll know that you have chosen a good place to live. This shows that dogs are welcome in the area. If there’s a playground nearby, but many “no dogs allowed” signs, you could be in a place where dogs aren’t welcome many places. You want to feel that your dog is welcome especially in outdoor spaces. 


There Are Facilities For Dogs Nearby


If you can easily find a groomer, a vet, and a pet supply store nearby, you know that you’re in a good place for your dog. You can see that there’s a community surrounding you that cares about animals. These types of facilities allow you to keep your pet healthy, clean, and happy. You may even have easier access to other important things for you and your dogs like pet sitters, dog walkers, and more. 


You Can Find Plenty Of Walking Paths


If you love to walk, you’ll probably be looking for this feature in a neighborhood anyways, but walking paths are a good sign that dogs are welcome in a place. You need sidewalks, places without a lot of traffic, and perhaps some trails to help keep your dog active and healthy. Dogs will also love exploring new places often to keep their keen senses in check. 


Look At Local Establishments


If you stop into local coffee shops or restaurants and see dogs there, you definitely know for sure that you have chosen a great community for dog lovers. This is a sign that dogs are a part of everyday life, accepted, welcome, and almost required! Pets are a part of the family in a community like this. Your new home will not only be great for you but for your beloved pet as well.


Dogs are a man’s best friends, but the mess they bring into your home? Not so much. Learn how you can have a clean house and a lovable pup at the end of each day. Here are ten tips below to get the best of both worlds. 

1. Groom regularly. Keep less fur off your floors and furniture by brushing your dog on a regular schedule. Ideally, this would be a few times a week. Eliminate even more clean up by brushing out your pup outside when possible.

2. Sweep floors in high traffic areas with a microfiber cloth broom each day. The microfiber cloth will grab onto fur and dirt alike and can be reused. It’s also a quick and simple habit to develop and one you can easily delegate as a chore for the kids.

3. Dust often. Stay on top of fur build up by dusting a few areas of the home each night with a microfiber cloth. By just doing a room or two at a time it becomes a less overwhelming task and easier to do regularly. You can even keep a cloth stored away in each room to make the chore even simpler.

4. Vacuum furniture and drapes as well as carpeting. When you have a furry friend your vacuum is going to be working a lot harder around the house. You’ll want to vacuum drapes, furniture, and carpets frequently to stay on top of hair build up. Just as with dusting, you can do a few rooms at a time throughout the week to break up the tediousness of doing the whole house at once.

5. Lint brushes are your new best friend. You might as well fill a handbasket full of them the next time you’re at the store because you’ll never have too many. Store them where they can easily be on hand in closets, bathrooms, the mudroom and your family's’ vehicles. Where there is fur, there’s a way so be prepared to keep clothes fur free when leaving the house.

6. Take care of stains ASAP. Make cleaning up pet stains a no-brainer by putting together an easy to grab bucket filled with cleaning supplies that are made for the job. Be sure to include a pair of rubber gloves, a roll of paper towels, a microfiber cloth and your preferred cleaning solution.

And a bonus for the extra meticulous: wipe paws down with a microfiber cloth after walks. Microfiber clothes are wonderful multitaskers for household cleaners and now you can add “paw wipes” to the list. Before you let your dog run loose around the house after a walk gently wipe their paws with a dry microfiber cloth to catch any loose debris they could track inside.

We love our dogs. They are cute, funny and oh so loving. The messes that come with them, however, aren’t always so welcome. You can easily keep your home spick and span with a little preparation and a regular cleaning schedule. At the end of the day, you can admire your handiwork while curled up on the couch with your pooch.


Pets are a part of the family. When we welcome a new dog into the home, we often expect them to meet our standards of behavior without much guidance. Dogs, like children, require consistent training from all members of the family. They need positive reinforcement and clear signals from you to teach them what behavior is acceptable.

In this article, we’re going to cover some important house training tips for you and your canine companion. We’ll look at some of the common mistakes that new pet owners make, and talk about ways to curb undesirable behavior like chewing shoes or furniture or barking at windows.


Traits vs. behaviors

One common mistake new pet owners make is to attempt to place character traits on their dog. Words like pushy, protective, mischievous, etc. are all adjectives that we often use to describe our dogs.

However, as dog owners and home owners, our energy is better spent on recognizing and correcting behaviors. If your dog tears at a carpet or chews the corner of your sofa, it isn’t very helpful sitting around thinking of adjectives to describe your dog (like restless or anxious). Rather, we should think about the behavior itself and how to replace it.

Let’s jump right into some household behaviors and ways to replace them with desirable alternatives.

Chewing

Chewing is an important part of a dog’s life. Chewing itself is not a negative behavior, but when your dog starts demolishing furniture or eating your homework, it’s time to take steps to curb this behavior.

First, make sure your dog is eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise. Dogs who aren’t eating a fat and protein rich food or who are overeating are prone to having excessive energy. If they’re trapped indoors and have nothing to focus that energy on, they’ll turn to chewing things they aren’t supposed to.

To focus your dog’s energy on positive behaviors, take your dog for a walk, jog, or play with them. If you notice your dog attempting to chew things they shouldn’t be, draw their attention away and provide them with a better alternative.

Barking

Just like chewing, barking is not in itself a negative behavior. It’s when your dog barks excessively and inappropriately that it becomes problematic.

Dogs bark for several reasons: to get you to play, to show that they’re stressed or bored, and so on. If your dog spends a lot of time monitoring doors and windows and barking at passersby, there are a few things you can do to curb the behavior.

First, take away the trigger. In this case, that could be closing the curtains or restricting your dog’s access to the room. If your dog is worried about strangers passing by the house, they are likely already too tense to begin training an alternative behavior to barking. If it’s noises that alarm your dog, try playing soft music to mask the noises for a day or two.

Once you’re ready to start training, have someone walk past outside where your dog can see from the window or make a noticeable noise outside. Reward your dog with treats when they do not react until they become more comfortable with the outside distractions.